Saturday, April 19, 2014

Celebrate Easter and National Soyfoods Month with Edamame Hummus

Today I'm getting things prepared and ready for Easter Sunday, as I'm sure all of you are too.  My Farmer and I are smoking a pork loin for tomorrow and we're incharge of bringing some sweet corn that we froze last summer and a couple appetizers.  One of the appetizers I am bringing for Easter Dinner is Edamame Hummus.

I chose Edamame Hummus for a few reasons.  First, it is very easy and quick.  Second, I've had a craving for hummus this week.  And third, I love sharing soy recipes, especially during April since it in National Soyfoods Month!  My Farmer and I don't raise edamame but we do raise soybeans.  Edamame is a special variety of soybeans that is harvested immaturely and green, versus maturely, like we do ours.  We let our soybeans mature fully, turn brown and dry in the field before we harvest them.  Edamame is a delicious, healthy and protein-packed bean that can be used in both cold and warm dishes.  You can find edamame primarily in the frozen food section either shelled or in the pod.  If you buy it in the pod be sure not to eat the pod, because they are very fibrous and hard to digest, let alone try to eat.


Edamame Hummus

1, 10-oz bag frozen shelled edamame, cooked
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup canned tan soybeans, rinsed and drained (I couldn't find tan soybeans at my grocery store so I substituted garbanzo beans)
2 Tbsp soybean oil (If you look at the ingredient list on the back of vegetable oil, usually, if not always, the only ingredient is soybean oil!)
2 tsp. lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste


Combine ingredients in food processor an pulse until mixture is smooth.
Serve with favorite vegetables and crackers.  Makes 1 1/2 cups.
Recipe adapted from The Soyfoods Council.

Have you ever cooked with Edamame?  What is your favorite way to eat Edamame?  Remember to Comment for a Cause!

4 comments:

  1. I went away for work several years ago, big conference in Florida. We had Edamane as a snack. Of course I had no idea how to eat this, one of the east coast managers told me to dip the pod in the salt, then put the whole thing in my mouth, pull the pod out and eat the beans. Wow!

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    1. I know I lot of people enjoy buying it in the pod and eating it just that way as a snack.

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  2. What an interesting idea that is sure to be a conversation starter at some gatherings!

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    1. It is a good appetizer and a good conversation starter ;)

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