Monday, April 18, 2016

What it means to be a "Blue Family"

This month my Comments for a Cause donation is going to Iowa C.O.P.S.  This organization provides resources to surviving family members and affected co-workers of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty.  After an accident that took place at the end of the last month, my heart wanted to do something to support the families affected, and the entire police family, which includes my brother-in-law and sister.  I asked my sister to write up some things she's learned about being a police or "blue" family and here are her reflections:

What it means to be a Police of "Blue" Family - Support Iowa C.O.P.S.
My Sister and Brother-in-Law
after he was sworn in at the Des Moines Police Department
It is hard to believe that my husband has been a police officer for nearly 4 years.  So much has changed since that day he was sworn in.  Being hired by the police department started him on a career that he can see himself doing until retirement.  Not only is his job his passion, but it also gave our family the stability we wanted before starting a family.  Since then we've had a son (now 18 months) and have another on the way.  Adjusting to this new lifestyle as a "police family" has had its challenges, but also its rewards, and I've learned many things along the way:

  1. To be flexible.  Plans will be broken and holidays missed.  I've learned to expect that our schedule will always change.
  2. The importance of a kiss good bye.  Always remember to say "I love you" before he heads to work.  It's easy to forget sometimes how dangerous his job can be, so making this a priority is important.
  3. That the "cop" in my husband is always "on".  Whether we're driving to the grocery store or sitting in a restaurant, my husband is always thinking like a cop.  He is always aware of our surroundings and the people in them.
  4. To believe.  Not only in the person behind the badge - but in the job itself.  Because it's not just their job, it's who they are.  Supporting them and their profession makes all the difference.
  5. That this "blue family" truly is just that.  A family.  And that when times get tough we will all bind together.  Friends and strangers alike, we are all deeply connected through this profession.

Thanks again to my sister for be a guest writer for this post.  I am proud of both my brother-in-law and sister for their service.  Remember to comment all month long to support Iowa C.O.P.S. through my Comments for a Cause program!

18 comments:

  1. Thank you Brandon for all that you do.Thank you Amanda for being a great support to him and for all that you do. May your family be blessed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for commenting and your support of their family.

      Delete
    2. Great lessons for every family, but especially for a "blue" family....

      Delete
  2. My grandfather was a police officer, and I have a cousin who serves Charles City as a police officer. I think many of the lessons could be applied to farmers :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is what I thought too when my sister sent me the post. I think that is partly why she is such a great supporter for my brother-in-law. She grew up and understands the farm life, so she has been able to transition to the police life a little easier.

      Delete
  3. Great cause. Hope you get many Comments for this Cause

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a great cause and of course a noble career!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Carlee. I think all public service jobs are very noble careers.

      Delete
  5. We are a proud family of blue.. that includes not only their little growing family but yours and our extended family as well. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for being a blue family and for commenting :)

      Delete
  6. Nothing is more important than the love between the your family as a whole & your extended blue family! I'm proud to be a part of it as well, but am more proud of my man behind the badge & love this cause! Thank you for bringing this to others attn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for commenting and for your family's service.

      Delete
  7. My 'family' is orange rather than blue (www.ses.vic.gov.au), but still resonated with me massively. Being flexible with arrangements? Definitely. I've sometimes wondered if that's why we have so many couples in my unit: people join, and shortly afterwards their wife/boyfriend/etc joins as well. I think it's so the date doesn't have to end just because the pager's gone off. And, your unit really does become a family. Like any family, there's squabbles and rivalries, but when a job happens and somebody needs to be helped, all the petty stuff drops by the wayside and you work as a team.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great way of describing how the "Blue Family" and your "Orange Family" work. Thanks for commenting and thanks for your service!

      Delete
  8. I am so saddened by what has happened in my home state of Iowa. Prayers to all the blue families and especially to your sister and husband.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi, I find reading this article a joy. It is extremely helpful and interesting and very much looking forward to reading more of your work.tank removal services nj

    ReplyDelete